Labor History in 2:00

Labor History in 2min
On this day in labor history, the year was 1852. That was the day Socialist leader Daniel De Leon was born in Curaçao to Dutch Jewish parents. As a young man, he traveled Europe. He settled in New York City, and earned a law degree from Columbia University in 1878. De Leon joined the Socia...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1903. That was the day prominent civil rights activist Ella Baker was born in Norfolk, Virginia. Her parents moved to Littleton, North Carolina when she was young. She often listened to her grandmother’s stories of slave revolts and of the brutality...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1945. That was the day President Truman appointed a fact-finding panel to investigate the General Motors strike. As many as 320,000 UAW GM workers had been on strike for nearly three weeks. They had suffered deep wage cuts, deteriorating working con...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1918. That was the day streetcar workers in Kansas City walked off the job. It was the third strike since August 1917. Workers had previously struck for union recognition and joined the city general strike that Spring. By summer, the city was so d...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1915. That was the day the one millionth Model T rolled off the Ford assembly line in Highland Park, near Detroit. Henry Ford started Model T production seven years earlier. For nearly 20 years, the Tin Lizzie served as the first affordable vehicle,...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1958. That was the day twelve ultra-conservatives, including industrialists Robert Welch, Fred Koch and Harry Lynde Bradley gathered in Indianapolis to found the John Birch Society. These men saw secret cabals and communist conspiracy everywhere. ...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1941. That was the day eighteen supporters of the Socialist Workers Party were sentenced in the first Smith Act trial. Earlier that summer, twenty-nine militants had been targeted and arrested for their leadership of events in Minneapolis during the...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1896. That was the day eleven steam engineers met in Chicago to found the National Union of Steam Engineers, the forerunner of the International Union of Operating Engineers. Ten of the eleven came from the stationary field. They often worked 60-90 ...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1907. That was the day an explosion rocked Fairmont Coal Company’s number 6 and number 8 coal mines in Monongah, West Virginia, killing 367 miners. Newspaper reports estimated the number of dead to be as high as 500. It is considered the worst mine ...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 2008. That was the day UE local 1110 members at Republic Windows in Chicago began a five–day occupation to protest the imminent closure of their plant. A month earlier, Republic workers witnessed management moving machinery out of the factory. The...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1946. That was the day Federal Judge T. Alan Goldsborough fined John L. Lewis $10,000 and the United Mine Workers $3.5 million. In what was characterized as “a roaring courtroom scene,” Lewis rose to challenge the judge to fine him whatever he wante...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1946. That was the day a general strike erupted in Oakland, California. Workers, mostly women, had been on strike for a month at two downtown department stores. Teamsters honored their picket lines and refused to make deliveries. Infuriated owners o...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1859. That was the day John Brown was hanged in Charles Town, Virginia in what is now West Virginia. He had been sentenced to death on charges of treason, murder and insurrection for his role in the raid on the United States Federal Armory at Harper’s F...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1912. That was the day the Anaconda Copper Company instituted its rustling card system at its copper mines in Butte, Montana. The company used the rustling card in two ways: as a work permit and as way to keep track of miners. A miner looking for work wo...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1930. That was the day the world lost the miners’ angel, Mother Jones. She had crossed the country many times over, been involved in practically every strike that built the labor movement; stood with miners and steel workers and mill children everywhere...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1937. That was the day the National Labor Relations Board began hearings on an unfair labor practice brought by the International Union Mine, Mill and Smelters. Mine, Mill had been fighting the union busting tactics at Eagle-Picher Lead Company. The unio...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1953. That was the day 400 photo-engravers at six New York City newspapers walked off the job. Members of the AFL’s International Photo-Engravers Union had just voted down arbitration. All but one local newspaper, The New York Herald Tribune were idled a...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1936. That was the day 1200 production workers at Detroit’s Midland Steel sat-down for higher wages, an end to piecework and union recognition. The strike was called just before noon. When 800 on the second shift arrived for work, they readily handed th...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1919.  That was the day four leaders of the Carpenters union were shot dead in Bogalusa, Louisiana.  The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and the International Union of Timber Workers had embarked on an organizing drive of white and black workers at G...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
On this day in labor history, the year was 1942. That was the day the completion of the Alaskan Highway or Alcan, was celebrated at Soldier’s Summit.  There had been proposals for a highway connecting the United States to Alaska since the early 1920s. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Presid...
[DELETE] [EDIT] MP3
Receive an e-mail digest when there's new content